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Lori Bitter talks to AARP members at AARP’s Ideas@50+: Multigenerational lifestyles & grandparents with realtor.com

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AARP’s Ideas@50+ event in San Diego featured AARP TEK’s new RealPad roll-out, the introduction of Joanne Jenkins as AARP’s new CEO and stars ranging from Kevin Spacey to Julia Louis Dreyfus to Martha Stewart. Move.com – the parent of realtor.com and seniorhousingnet.com hosted AARP members in a special “back porch” environment complete with lemonade and fresh baked cookies. Members heard from experts in senior care, caregiving, and aging in place technology. Paul Irving, Milken Institute, and author of The Upside of Aging, spoke on “Making Cities More Senior Friendly.” Lori did a presentation on “The New Multigenerational Lifestyle,” based on her new book The Grandparent Economy.

Is Grandparenting the “ultimate do-over?”

Read Lori Bitter’s comments in the Huffington Post story:

Growing up, Ed White spent relatively little time with his father, who worked in a power plant, climbing from engineer to vice president. His dad put in long hours, leaving early in the morning and coming home late. After dinner, he would read the newspaper, then do more work.  Read more . . .

 

Keep the Holidays Happy for Your Kids and Grandkids

Empty nesters can put a lot of pressure on the holiday season. As former “helicopter parents,” we no longer have day-to-day involvement with (or control over) our adult children and many of us are joining the ranks of grandparents. Short of cutting out our tongues, there are many things we can do to ensure a fun, peaceful holiday visit to create memories for the entire family.

Here are some of my tips from current Allstate blog post. How do you keep the lines of communication open?

Building With Multiple Generations In Mind

The recently released MetLife Report on American Grandparents revealed that 1 in 10 households is headed by a grandparent with at least one grandchild living there. The study reports that part of the reason for this is high rates of unemployment among the children’s parents. Interestingly, in 1980 there were only 28 million Americans living in a household that included two adult generations or a grandparent and at least one other generation. By 2008 the number was 49 million Americans living inter-generationally.

In a recent New York Times story about this trend, Kermit Baker, a senior fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard and the chief economist of the American Institute of Architects, said, “Immigrants are a source of growing demand (for intergenerational homes), and their household composition is different in fundamental ways from the domestic-born.”

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Sharing the Road: Grandparents Can Mentor Teen Drivers

Parents and grandparents alike know that “pit of the stomach” feeling when a child grabs the keys and drives away for the first time. It’s both exhilarating to share their freedom and frightening to consider all of the things that could happen when they are behind the wheel.

A new study recently revealed that grandparents are increasingly paying for auto insurance for both children and grandchildren. A Bureau of Labor Statistics study shows that baby boomers spent $863 million on used cars given as gifts, suggesting that these cars are being purchased for grandchildren drivers. What does this mean for you as you prepare for your grandchildren to hit the road?

Check out these tips from my latest Allstate blog.

Do you have some tips of your own you would share?

Looking At Lucrative Lifestages: Engaging American Grandparents

The recent release of “The MetLife Report on American Grandparents,” by Peter Francese with MetLife Mature Market Institute, reveals the changing face of grandparents in the United States. It also provides a roadmap for companies with products and services for children. Increasingly, grandparents are helping young families financially navigate in this tough economic climate, paying for items essential to day-to-day life, and also looking forward to big-ticket items like tuition, cars, and college.

In 2010, there were an estimated 65 million grandparents in the United States alone; households headed by someone over the age of 45 accounts for 60% of the nation’s income. One in four adults in this country is a grandparent.

Today, a grandparent is the head of almost one in ten households and has a grandchild in residence. In spite of recent economic events, consumer spending in households 55+ has risen faster than any other age category, outpacing inflation. By 2020, projections reveal an increase to 80 million grandparents, one in three adults in the U.S.

Booming Grands: Younger, hipper more diverse grandparents

The majority of today’s grandparents are from the Baby Boomer generation; they appear more youthful, vital and active than grandparents of previous generations. In reality…

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My New Role as Publisher of GRAND Magazine

With its latest September/October 7th anniversary issue being sent to subscribers today, GRAND Magazine, the digital magazine for Grandparents and their families, relaunches with a new focus on first-time Grandparents.

I am excited to announce my new role as Publisher of GRAND, as it is linked to my other exciting new role – as a first-time grandparent myself. I very much look forward to working with Christine Crosby, the Editorial Director, and Christine Bettencourt, Managing Editor, at GRAND Magazine. Christine Crosby was at the forefront by launching GRAND as a digital publication in 2007. As Christine has stated, now is the time when digital magazines are coming into their own. It is the direction in which publishing is heading, with its benefits for advertisers of the digital format, such as the multimedia features, and delivering the desirable profile of the digital magazine reader. They have appeal to consumers as a ‘green’ alternative to print, leaving a smaller carbon footprint that will benefit future generations, which is of particular importance to grandparents.

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