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Helpful Apps For Baby Boomers: Making Life Easier With Tech

Our thanks to Bash Sarmiento for this contribution to our blog.

[Source: Pexels]

With technology becoming more and more user-friendly, it is almost impossible to say that older adults and seniors cannot use a mobile phone or have access to the internet. Both groups have willingly kept themselves up to date with the latest gadgets and already have the technical knowledge to be able to keep up with modern times.

A study by the Pew Research Center (2019) revealed that 60-year-old Americans and older spend more than half of their leisure time in front of their TVs, computers or laptops, tablets, smartphones, and other electronic devices daily. There is also a significant increase in terms of seniors’ adoption of digital technology. In comparison, only 14% of those ages 65 and older were internet users back in 2000. This number increased to an impressive 73% in 2019. Also worth noting, about 53% of seniors are already smartphone owners. 

This is not a surprise especially when technology has made an effort to penetrate the baby boomer and senior markets with gadgets that are useful and foolproof as they can be for their age. Technology for older adults includes high-tech wearables like a smartwatch which can monitor their blood pressure and act as a pedometer to track their steps. Smartphones have become more convenient with screen magnification, talk-to-text, and assistive touch features. Plenty of mobile phone applications are also accessible through various smartphone app markets. Apps that can genuinely make the lives of people from all walks of life, more so, age groups easier and more convenient. 

Here is a list of some awesome apps that can facilitate their social interactions, track their health and wellness, sharpen their memory, and others:

  1. Facebook for socials.

According to Statista (2021), a percentage of 11.3 represents Facebook users ages 55 and over worldwide. No matter small, it still provides a digital presence to the baby boomer and senior age. Facebook has been a useful app for keeping in touch with busy friends and family members. With its improved algorithms, it has also become a platform where former classmates, schoolmates, and colleagues reunite. Through Facebook Messenger where they can call, send a message, or video chat regardless of the distance, communication is a sure success. They can enjoy sending messages or just lurk and check the newsfeed to get a glimpse of what everyone has been up to. 

  1. Magnifying Glass with Light for Productivity

This app is a great way to enjoy comfortable reading. While most smartphones have the feature to magnify the texts on screen and make screen-reading an easy task, the magnifying glass app uses the phone’s camera to magnify texts of hardbound books, magazines, and other external reading materials. The users just need to position their device’s camera over the text and it will automatically enlarge and brighten the text shown on the screen to facilitate easy reading.

  1. Shopwell and WebMD for wellness.

A healthy diet is crucial in keeping the mind and body in the best shape. The Shopwell app can help in identifying food that can fit one’s health goals and needs. Whether you are following a plant-based diet, carnivore diet, or anything the doctors recommend, this app can help you make a nutritious grocery list that you can take to your local store or market. It will also recommend alternatives to ensure that you are on track with the right options. WebMD, on the other hand, offers an array of researched medical studies and conditions so it is the perfect reference if you want to check symptoms or simply locate the nearest physician or hospital. This app can also identify whether or not meds can be bought over-the-counter or requiring medical prescriptions, their side effects, and uses. You can also put up a reminder for your maintenance medicines. You can also find home remedies and research at-home health services from the same app. 

  1. Senior Discounts & Coupons App and Mint for thrift finds and budgeting.

The Senior Discounts & Coupons app may not track your savings but it can help you find discounts and sales. It can help you find out which stores, hotels, and restaurants offer discounts for seniors. Mint, however, lets you monitor your spending as this is a personal finance app where you can sync your bank accounts on one page and check each expenditure. You can also control your spending habits by designating a limit and it organizes your spending into charts and categorizes it into groceries, gas, food, entertainment, etc. It is also a platform where you can pay your rent and other bills so you do not have to go elsewhere.

  1. Words with Friends 2 for leisure.

This is an interactive Scrabble-themed game that older adults can enjoy while maintaining their cognitive health. In this game, a board will be displayed on the screen along with a list of letters that can be used to form words. The game keeps scores and will provide new letters as frequently needed. It can be played alone but it will be more fun and engaging when played with friends or family members in competitive teams.

Smartphone technology has changed over the years and these apps are only the tip of the iceberg. The more older adults are committed to transitioning to the digital world, the more mobile app developers rapidly take action and make these helpful apps readily available. Share this with anyone who might just need this list today.

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About the Author:

Bash Sarmiento is a writer and an educator from Manila. He writes laconic pieces in the education, lifestyle and health realms. His academic background and extensive experience in teaching, textbook evaluation, business management, and traveling are translated into his works.

Links:

Instagram: https://instagram.com/bashsarmiento

LinkedIn: https://ph.linkedin.com/in/ringwald-rommel-p-sarmiento-ii-69270413aFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/sarmientobash/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sarmientobash/

Sharing Hacking Life Shifts with Marin County Section on Aging

I am excited and looking forward to be sharing insights from our latest research study, Hacking Life Shifts with Marin County Section on Aging on March 18th, 10:00-11:30 am PT.

Most of us are creatures of habit. We get comfortable with our routines. We form attitudes and values that guide and influence our behavior. But then change happens. And that’s part of life. As we get older, change can be difficult and profound. When it comes suddenly, change can disrupt not only our routines, but also the very direction of our lives — sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse. How we navigate change is a reflection of not only who we are, but also who supports us and how. Change creates needs for new types of help. And, that’s where brands have a role to play. It’s important to understand that Life Shifts are not discrete. To the contrary, they’re often intertwined. Nearly half of adults aged 45 and over (47% to be exact) find themselves in at least one of the five Life Shifts studied. So, there’s a decent chance you (or a loved one) are currently going through one or more these changes.

Hacking Life Shifts – A c-level read-out of key insights from this groundbreaking study of how three generations of Americans are navigating profound changes along the aging journey.

To join the virtual networking meetup and for more info, visit us here.

For more information about Hacking Life Shifts, you can enjoy the e-book on the study: download Hacking Life Shifts here.

The Best Shoes for Older Adults to Fight Common Foot Issues

Our thanks to Dj Crino for this contribution to our blog.

Many people suffer from foot issues, and as we get older, these can become more prevalent and painful.

Choosing the right pair of shoes is important regardless of the size, shape, or general condition of your feet. However, when you do have foot problems, the type of shoes you opt for is even more important. Choosing the right shoes goes beyond just looking for men’s comfortable sneakers or comfortable women’s shoes. You need to focus on particular features that provide support to the part of your foot causing you problems.  

The following are some general tips to help you choose the best shoes for foot issues you may deal with.

Heel Pain

There are underlying causes of heel pain like plantar fasciitis, which causes pain on the bottom of the heel, and Achilles tendonitis, causing pain at the back of the heel. Bursitis and heel spurs can also trigger heel pain.

The key, if you have heel pain, is to choose supportive sneakers, like Taos women’s supportive sneakers, or sneakers for men with support. When you have shoes with arch support, it helps align your feet properly and distributes weight evenly across your foot. That then reduces the pulling and pressure on your heel that causes pain.

Even when choosing sandals, if you have heel pain, make sure they have adequate support.

Bunions

Bunions can cause stiffness in your big toe, and having a bunion can put pressure on your other toes. You want shoes that fit well, and never wear shoes that are too tight. Tight shoes can make bunions worse.

Look for shoes with ample space around your toes, and keep the heel low. Along with the wide tox box, you want sturdy soles and arch support. You ideally want a full range of motion in the joint affected by the bunion.

Corns and Calluses

Corns and calluses can be caused by factors including spending most of your day on your feet, regularly running or participating in activities where your feet are rubbing against your shoes and socks, and also wearing shoes primarily for fashion too often.

To find shoes that are good for existing corns and calluses and can help prevent future ones, look for a pair that is comfortable and gives you room to move your toes but also feels secure on your foot.

When your shoes are too big, they can rub while you walk. If your shoes are too small, they can put too much pressure on specific parts of your foot.

Also, don’t buy wide shoes unless you really need them. If your shoes are too wide for your foot, it causes sliding inside the shoe, which can lead to calluses.

Instead of getting an unnecessarily wide shoe, choose with one an insole providing arch support.

Pain in the Ball of the Foot

Finally, pain in the ball of the foot is sometimes referred to as metatarsalgia. If you have this issue, it may be due to the fact that the fat pad on the ball of your foot is worn down. Look for shoes with plenty of padding in the forefoot to make up for that lost natural cushioning.

Connecting on a Budget: Video Chat Solutions for the Pandemic

Our thanks to Jim Vogel for this contribution to our blog.

Learn more about the mature consumer market at The Business of Aging.

The longer the COVID-19 pandemic lasts, the harder it is to remain isolated from friends and family. However, for older adults and other vulnerable groups, traveling and attending big family gatherings is still too risky. The need to connect safely during the pandemic has given rise to a demand for affordable, user-friendly video chat technology for older adults. But while tablets and gadgets are cheaper than a plane ticket, they still put a dent in older adults’ budgets.

How can older adults reap the benefits of social technology on limited budgets? These cost-saving solutions keep older Americans connected through the pandemic.

Free Apps for Staying Connected

For older adults on a tight or limited budget, free apps are the best place to start. Free apps for the social distancing era include the following:

Facebook Messenger

Facebook Messenger is a great tool because most of us are already on Facebook. In addition to chatting with friends, Facebook Messenger supports video calls for up to eight people and Rooms for 50.

FaceTime

FaceTime’s biggest drawback is that it’s only available on Apple devices. But for Mac users, this free iOS app is one of the simplest out there.

WhatsApp

Big family? WhatsApp supports group chats for up to 256 people so everyone stays in the loop. WhatsApp also supports video calling for connecting face-to-face.

Skype

Skype is another video chat solution that works no matter what type of device or operating system you’re using. Skype supports one-on-one or group video and voice calls.

Marco Polo

Marco Polo is the best app for families separated by time zones. Rather than chatting in real-time, Marco Polo lets users send video messages that can be stored and viewed any time. While Marco Polo’s premium version costs $5 a month, users can access the app’s core features for free.

Teleparty (formerly Netflix Party)

Whether families want to view a new release or a holiday classic, Teleparty lets them do it together with synchronized playback and group chat. Users need a Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, or HBO subscription to watch, but the Teleparty app itself is free.

How to Save Money on Video Devices

When it comes to new technology, older adults prefer to keep it simple. Devices with complicated interfaces and batteries that constantly need charging are likely to end up in a desk drawer.

Tablets and smart displays are the best options for video calling. More comfortable than tiny smartphone screens, these gadgets are both feature-rich and easy to use. Unfortunately, they’re also pricey: Most smart displays start around $200. These include the Amazon Echo Show, Google Nest Hub, and Facebook Portal. Meanwhile, popular tablets like the iPad and Samsung Galaxy Tab run anywhere from a couple of hundred dollars to $1,000-plus.

Two notable exceptions are the Echo Show 8 and Fire HD. While these devices offer smaller displays than the other options, at around $100 they’re great options for buyers on a budget. Alternatively, buyers can wait for price drops on the most popular video calling devices. Watching the Daily Deals at Best Buy is a great way to get a steep discount on new technology. Shoppers can also use a Best Buy discount code to save at any time.

Not everyone wants to purchase a new device to video chat. Whether they’re minimalist or just on a budget, older adults can upgrade their video calling experience without spending hundreds. Many of the most popular webcams, including the Logitech C310 and Microsoft LifeCam, cost less than $50 and come with built-in microphones. A ring light or LED light panel ensures even lighting and good video quality at any time of day.

Now more than ever, it’s important to stay connected. While some older adults assume anything high-tech is out of reach, connecting face-to-face during the pandemic is more accessible than you might think. Whether an older adult has $50 to spend or $1,000, there’s a video calling solution that’s right for them.

FAQs on Practicing Yoga Amid the Pandemic: How Seniors Can Stay Safe

Our thanks to Jim Vogel for this contribution to our blog. 

Yoga is a great form of exercise for older adults, but the pandemic has disrupted many seniors’ yoga routines. Not only are studios closed in many areas of the country, seniors also tend to be at a greater risk of developing severe symptoms from COVID-19. But it doesn’t mean you have to put yoga on hold. Find a few solutions to help you continue doing yoga throughout the pandemic.

Q1: In what ways is yoga beneficial for seniors?

A1: You might be surprised at how much seniors can gain!

3 Surprising Health Benefits of Yoga for Seniors

How You Can Improve Your Balance with Yoga

4 Ways Yoga and Meditation Can Mellow the Mind and Soothe the Soul

 

Q2: How can I practice yoga at home if I’m hesitant about going to a studio?

A2: Even though some yoga studios are reopening, you might still feel uncomfortable in a group, and that’s okay. You can practice yoga at home in a variety of ways.

The 8 Best Online Yoga Classes of 2020

Chair Yoga for Seniors: Reduce Pain and Improve Health

Yoga At Home: Stay Motivated With This Insider Trick

How to Check Your Form When You’re Doing Yoga at Home

 

Q3: How can I practice yoga safely at home while avoiding pain and injuries?

A3: Finding motivation to do yoga at home is great, but you will also want some gear that makes it safe for you to practice without an instructor.

Why Are Seniors Turning to CBD?

Get Pain Relief with the 25 Best 1000mg CBD Creams of 2020

3 Yoga Props You Need in Your Routine

4 Yoga Mistakes that Can Cause Knee Pain

 

Q4: How can I stay safe if I decide to go to a yoga studio for in-person classes?

A4: If you want to enhance your home practice by trying in-person sessions, sign up for classes with a studio that has reopened. However, take precautions to stay safe.

How to Exercise with a Face Mask — And What Not to Do

When and How to Wash Your Hands

Coronavirus (COVID-19): What Do I Do If I Feel Sick?

How to Clean Your Yoga Mat the Right Way

 

Doing yoga amid the pandemic sometimes requires a different approach, but that shouldn’t stop you from trying. It’s worth setting up a practice area at home or even venturing out into the world to attend an in-person class — precautions in place.

4 Ways to Refresh and Feel Your Best Despite the Coronavirus

Our thanks to Gabriel Patel for this contribution to our blog. 

Feeling good about yourself – both inside and out – is essential for keeping a positive outlook on life. But since heading to the salon or beauty parlor hasn’t been an option for some time, you need to get creative when it comes to looking and feeling your best. Here are four ways to refresh, whether you’re staying home or heading out as pandemic restrictions lift.

1. Expand Your Perspective

As an older adult experiencing the pandemic, you might feel more “other” than ever before. Though quality of life is a concern for many people, empty nesters or those without family around often feel overlooked. But the truth is, the older generation has more of an influence on society and the economy than you might think.

Expanding your perspective by exploring resources from The Business of Aging could help reframe your thoughts on your coronavirus experiences. At the very least, you’ll learn that you have more to offer than the younger set might think.

2. Indulge in Self-Care

Self-care is one way to pamper yourself without leaving home. Whether you’re avoiding outings in public or want to stress less and continue to stay home, dedicating time to caring for your body is beneficial.

Schedule a spa day at home to refresh your body and mind. Consider adding CBD soap to your routine, especially if you’re managing dry or otherwise sensitive skin. Before buying, check out sizes, scents, and whether your favorite CBD soap is full- or broad-spectrum.

Other rejuvenating skin treatments can help combat the effects of staying indoors for so long. Remaining in self-isolation with the AC on has likely caused your skin to become drier than normal.

Prevention recommends choosing a moisturizer based on your skin type, whether you have sensitive skin or are prone to adult acne outbreaks. Especially for delicate facial skin, which becomes thinner as you age, consider a gentle moisturizing product.

If you plan to venture out as pandemic restrictions lift, pack sunblock along, too; studies suggest that only 15 percent of older adults regularly use sun protection.

3. Get Moving in New Ways

Moving your body is always trendy, but these days, it’s more about innovative routines that you can do anywhere.

Trying a virtual fitness class is a low-stakes way to try a new exercise regimen at home. Programs like SilverSneakers are typically covered by your health insurance and offer health provider-endorsed activities for enhancing balance, increasing muscle strength, and more.

If you opt for in-person courses, check out classes near you that take place outdoors. You can also seek fitness opportunities that employ other methods of reducing germ transmission, such as reducing class sizes and implementing social distancing.

4. Declutter Your Home

Like most Americans, you may have decided to start a new hobby or begin projects around the house during the pandemic. But the combination of doing more at home and not being able to entertain could mean your home has become cluttered.

You might not think it matters much, but Mayo Clinic confirms that clutter around the house can impact your mental health and distract you from important tasks. Extra stuff everywhere can even impact your sleep – so it’s vital to start creating more open space in your home.

Taking it step by step, and day by day is the best way to begin cleansing your living space. Break down tasks into manageable chunks, and you’ll accomplish more and feel better while doing it.

Staying home for such a long period has impacted many older adults in ways they didn’t expect. But now that society is reopening, the transition to the new normal requires an effort. By expanding your perspective, caring for yourself, and freeing up your living area, you can start to feel like yourself again – even as things continue to change.

Photo via Unsplash

After decades of denial, pandemic is making Minnesota baby boomers feel their age

By Kevyn Burger Special to the Star Tribune

Baby boomers, the generation that refuses to age, might have met their match in the coronavirus.

Marilyn and Juan Galloway exchanged a look that many married-with-children couples might recognize.

Their 22-year-old daughter had just dropped an unintentional bombshell, one that left them equal parts amused and wounded.

“She said, ‘If you guys get COVID, you’ve lived your lives,’ ” said Marilyn, of White Bear Lake. “She was dead serious, like, ‘You’re elderly and at the end of the road.’ We were stunned. We’re 55 and 63. We run, golf and bike. We’re more active than our kids. At the age that my grandmother wore a housecoat, I spiked my hair and dyed it purple.”

For baby boomers, it seems that COVID-19 has done what self-denial and evidence to the contrary has been unable to do: make them feel old.

For the generation whose youthful battle cry was “Don’t trust anyone over 30” and who prided themselves on remaining relevant as the years accumulated, being lumped in with the cohort regarded as frail and vulnerable has come as a shock.

“The pandemic has been a reckoning for baby boomers,” said Scott Zimmer, a speaker and trainer for Bridgeworks, a Wayzata consulting company that advises businesses on generational dynamics.

Based on sheer size, the 76 million American boomers, now between ages 56 and 74, have been courted by marketers since their postwar arrival. They have reframed every life stage they’ve passed through and were in the process of rewriting the script for their retirement years when the coronavirus arrived and stripped away their pretensions.

“They retain a youthful spirit and don’t want to slow down like previous generations. They take on encore careers and find new activities to be passionate about,” Zimmer said. “Now they’re forced to acknowledge that they’re not invincible. Even if they’re in great shape, they can’t deny that their age puts them in greater danger if they catch the virus.”

Dings and Dents

Writer Bill Souder’s upcoming biography of novelist John Steinbeck is titled “Mad at the World.”

That could also describe the 70-year-old author’s feeling about the way his age group is characterized.

“ ‘Seniors.’ ‘Elderly.’ I don’t like those terms. ‘Your sunset years.’ The labels they attach feel like they are trying to erase you. The message is that when you get older than a certain age, you’re in this other category. You are diminished, a fossil,” he said. “I don’t belong in that club.”

Souder has preferred to define himself by his activities rather than his age.

“I ride my bike, I still wade a trout stream. Last year I got a new hunting dog to trudge through the forest and fields with me. I do the same things I did when I was 40, but a little slower,” he said. “I’m like a golf ball. I’ve got dings and dents, a little asthma, a little heart disease.”

Since the arrival of the virus, Souder’s pre-existing conditions, previously regarded as minor and manageable, have prompted him to act with caution. He’s isolating in his home in Washington County in the company of his wife, their adult son who’s quarantining at home following a furlough and Sasha the wire-haired pointing griffon.

“At a certain age you are at an elevated risk and you have to live your life differently,” he admitted. “The science is clear. I can’t spin it.”

Ageism at the Root

For many boomers, the pandemic is revealing, even cementing, some long-held negative stereotypes associated with aging.

“They are experiencing ageism with the assumption that a number — their age — is the defining marker,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge, a national association of nonprofit providers of aging services. “They may have experienced ageism in the workplace, but not in their day-to-day lives. They’re seeing how the contributions of older adults are undervalued and underappreciated.”

Age is just a number, but how that number is perceived is subjective. As people get older, the definition of “old” changes. In a Pew Research Center study, only 21% of those between the ages of 65 and 74 said they felt old, and just 35% of those 75 and older self-identified that way.

Advances in medical science in the past half-century have created a longevity revolution that is giving Americans not only longer life spans, but more years of good health. Still, anyone north of 55 is often lumped into the same age category.

Lori Bitter believes that happens out of “ignorance or laziness.”

The president of the Business of Aging, a California consultancy that advises companies marketing to mature consumers, Bitter thinks the older demographic needs to be sliced thinner.

“There’s not enough understanding that 65 and 85 are vastly different, just as people who are 50 and those who are 65 are nowhere in the same territory. Some of the language used for this vast, diverse group is ridiculous,” she said.

“Companies and others trying to speak to the different ends of the cohort need to distinguish between them,” she said.

It’s a fine point that the pandemic does not take into account.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “the greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older,” the CDC also generalizes with the statement that “As you get older, your risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases.”

That means that in the foreseeable future, taking the threat of the virus into consideration may cause baby boomers to live more constricted lives.

“We really don’t want to get it, so we are being conservative,” said Souder. “We don’t touch our kids. We sit in the backyard. All bets are off on when that will change. But I’m not bedridden, I don’t have one foot in the grave. I’m here and a high-mileage version of myself.”

Kevyn Burger is a Minneapolis-based freelance broadcaster and writer.

This article is originally featured in StarTribune.

10 Innovative Apps for Seniors

Our thanks to Artur Meyster for this contribution to our blog. 

Smartphones each year are farther away from being a cellphone and closer to being a mobile supercomputer. Therefore, it is undoubted that they play an essential role in our daily lives. The rapid advancements of technology have allowed developers to create apps that can make our lives easier—especially for seniors. Whether or not you are a fan of tech, below are some innovative apps that might come in handy and bring about positive impacts in your life.

1. FallSafety

The app offers help when you need it the most. With its intelligent fall detection feature, FallSafety can detect when a user experiences a fall and will automatically send an alert to an emergency contact or healthcare organization. The app takes a few seconds after the fall to send the alert, in case it’s a false alarm. The app is available for Android, iOS, and Apple Watch users.

2. Red Panic Button 

This app is for everyone to use in emergencies. If you find yourself in a threatening situation or if you worry about your safety, you can whip out this app and press the red button that will immediately send a text message and an email containing your GPS coordinates to your emergency contacts. This app is especially great for seniors who have problems with mobility as it will ensure they get the right help at the right time, with just a push of a button.

3. Lumosity

Lumosity is a brain-training app that can help improve a user’s memory and focus. While we could all use a little brain teaser every now and then, seniors especially can benefit tremendously by using Lumosity as it keeps the mind active in a fun way. The app offers various interactive features to sharpen your problem-solving skills and math abilities, among others.

4. Seniors Phone

At the rate of which technology is advancing, it is understandable how some seniors might find it overwhelming. That is, however, a problem of the past. Seniors Phone is an app that changes the user interface of any smartphone to a simplified version. You can customize everything—from the size of the fonts to the buttons—to make it easier for a user to navigate the smartphone. Some other features include bright-colored widgets for better identification and an SOS button which can send a distress signal to an emergency contact. 

5. VizWiz

Many seniors have deteriorated vision which can make daily activities a real challenge. Enter the VizWiz app, which allows a user to take a photo of their surrounding and receive the corresponding descriptions. According to its developer, the app combines automatic image processing, anonymous web workers, and members of the user’s social network in order to collect fast and accurate answers to their questions.

6. EyeReader

This is another app that is meant to help individuals with visual impairments. The app is essentially a unique reading magnifier that can help many who find it difficult to read the smaller print. As we age, our visions will likely deteriorate, therefore this app can prove to be really helpful for seniors to perform daily tasks that involve reading.

7. MedMinder

MedMinder is not only an app, but it is also hooked to an automated pill dispenser. This innovative device helps seniors to stay independent by alerting them about the right time to take their medications. Its safety features ensure that pill mix-ups are a thing of the past. The dispenser will be locked at all times unless it’s time to take a pill. First, the compartment will flash, then the device will make a beeping noise before sending an alert via the mobile app. If the patient fails to take the pill at the right time, the app will notify all caregivers. 

8. LibriVox

We all love a good story but what happens when your vision starts to deteriorate and reading becomes more of a hassle than a hobby? Opt for audiobooks. LibriVox offers an extensive list of audiobooks that are recorded by volunteers, available on the free public domain for anyone and everyone interested. Users can either choose to listen to the audiobooks online or download them for later. 

9. Yesterday USA

For those who are feeling nostalgic about the old times, Yesterday USA is the perfect app for them. The app is an internet radio station that broadcasts old radio shows from the 1920s to the 1970s. Now in its 31st year, the best part about Yesterday USA is you can tune in any time of the day as it operates 24 hours. 

10. Medisafe 

Medisfe is an app that works with Machine Learning and AI. The app is for seniors to keep track of all their medications. It gives reminders of when to take each pill and also alerts users when the prescription is running low. Medisafe also lets users enter their caregivers’ information, allowing the app to send alerts if the users forgot to take a pill.

What to Do With Your Home After Transitioning to Assisted Living

Our thanks to Jim Vogel for this contribution to our blog. 

When seniors transition into an assisted living facility, there are many questions raised about the home they’re leaving behind. After spending years of their life in their house, it can be difficult to determine the best option. Generally speaking, there are three choices seniors are faced with: selling their home, renting it out, or giving it to a family member. Each option comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. It would behoove seniors and their loved ones to consider their financial and overall life circumstances before deciding on one of these options.

Sell the house to pad your savings.

The traditional step to take when moving out of a home is to list it on the market and put the proceeds toward a new property. Even though you’re not going to purchase a new home, you can still use the money to help cover the cost of the assisted living facility (assisted living in California averages $3,750 a month) or to pay off prior debts.

Before listing your home on the market, it’s important to take note of the average price of similar properties in your area to help determine what to do with your own (Alameda homes have been selling for an average of $979,000 over the last month). You want to avoid missing out on potential earnings from underpricing and prolonging a sale due to asking for too much. If you have the resources, hiring a real estate agent can also be a great way to sell your house smoothly.

Entrust it to a family member.

If you don’t like the idea of losing your home or renting it out to tenants, you can always entrust it to a family member for safekeeping. You’ll be able to maintain ownership of the property without having to worry about maintenance or upkeep. You might even find a relative willing to live in the home while paying a small fee. You’ll have the benefit of monthly income without the hassle and responsibility of dealing with renters.

Some seniors may want to go a step further and legally transfer ownership of their old home to a family member. This can be done immediately following your transition into an assisted living home or set up for a posthumous transfer of ownership. Either way, you can be sure that the home is taken care of and stays in the family.

Find tenants for a monthly income.

It’s a sad fact that millions of seniors in the United States are struggling financially, but if you’re willing to put in a little effort, your old home can be an excellent source of passive income.

The first step to turning your home into a rental property is making any necessary updates and renovations to make it livable and appealing. Next, you’ll need to find reliable tenants with good credit scores, little to no debt, and no criminal history. You may also have to hire a property manager to care for the property while you’re away. It can be a small yet necessary cost for seniors who don’t have the physical ability and time to keep a rental property up and running.

Moving into assisted living raises many questions about what to do with the home you’re leaving behind. When you have such an emotional connection to your home, it can be difficult to make the right choice. Before making the final call, make sure to consider your current circumstances and think about which option is most suitable.

Photo Credit: Pixabay.com

Simple Ways to Relieve Insomnia Without Prescription Medication

Our thanks to Gabriel Patel for this contribution to our blog. 

Sleep disorders are surprisingly common. In fact, Science Daily says about one in four Americans struggles with insomnia every year. It’s normal for things like work stress, major life transitions, and emotionally upsetting events to trigger brief episodes of insomnia. Even something as simple as an old mattress or a noisy new neighbor can cause sudden sleep problems.

Fortunately, 75% of people with acute insomnia will recover without developing persistent or chronic sleep issues. The best part? You don’t need to reach for addictive sleep medications to resolve your battle with sleeplessness. Here are some simple but effective ways to improve your sleep naturally.

Invest in a New Bed

Old mattresses are a common cause of sleeplessness and are sometimes the culprit behind health issues like sleep apnea and allergies. If you’re finding it hard to get comfortable at night or you’re waking up stiff in the morning, a new mattress can make a world of difference in your sleep quality.

Finding the right mattress is a must, so read some online reviews before purchasing a bed to ensure your new investment will be a good fit for your sleep style and body type. For example, mattresses made by Tuft & Needle tend to provide better support for petite and medium-sized sleepers but can cause too much sinkage for people over 250 pounds. Whether you sleep on your side, back, or stomach is also important to keep in mind during your mattress search.

Stick to a Consistent Sleep Schedule

If you go to bed at different times every night, you may be fighting against your body’s natural internal clock. Try to stick to a regular sleep schedule every single day—yes, even on weekends! This will help condition your body and brain to start winding down at the same time every night. You should also find it much easier to wake up on those early weekday mornings if you avoid sleeping in on the weekends.

If you need your weekend sleep-ins to catch up on missed sleep during the week, try to go to bed earlier. The CDC recommends that adults get at least 7 hours of sleep each night! While this might mean going to bed much earlier than you’re used to, it’s vital to happy and healthy daytime functioning. If you have trouble getting on track, you can use your phone to remind you.

Engage in a Relaxing Bedtime Routine

Going to bed right after writing emails to clients or dealing with family stress will leave your mind reeling for hours after your head hits the pillow. Separate your daytime stressors from your bedtime with a relaxing routine.

Start your routine at the same time each evening. Engage in activities that you find calming, such as gentle yoga, meditation, reading, or listening to a podcast. It can also help to begin your routine by writing a to-do list for the following day, so you can get any lingering obligations or responsibilities out of your head for the night. Recent research reported by CTV News found that people who wrote a thorough to-do list before bed fell asleep faster than those who did not!

Avoid Stimulation Before Bed

It’s important to keep stimulating activities far away from your relaxing bedtime routine. Electronic devices, for example, emit a stimulating light wavelength that can interfere with your sleep-triggering hormones, so staring at them can be counterproductive. High-intensity exercise and heavy meals right before bed can also keep you awake.

If you need a snack, reach for sleep-promoting foods like yogurt or tart cherry juice. Most importantly, avoid stimulants like caffeine and nicotine before bed. And while alcohol is not a stimulant, it can also interfere with your sleep quality and lead to waking in the night.

Suffering through an episode of insomnia can be very frustrating. While it may be tempting to reach for a quick fix in the form of medication, adopting healthy sleep habits will serve you much better in the long run. If nothing you try is helping, consider making an appointment with your doctor to get to the root of the problem.