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Connecting on a Budget: Video Chat Solutions for the Pandemic

Our thanks to Jim Vogel for this contribution to our blog.

Learn more about the mature consumer market at The Business of Aging.

The longer the COVID-19 pandemic lasts, the harder it is to remain isolated from friends and family. However, for older adults and other vulnerable groups, traveling and attending big family gatherings is still too risky. The need to connect safely during the pandemic has given rise to a demand for affordable, user-friendly video chat technology for older adults. But while tablets and gadgets are cheaper than a plane ticket, they still put a dent in older adults’ budgets.

How can older adults reap the benefits of social technology on limited budgets? These cost-saving solutions keep older Americans connected through the pandemic.

Free Apps for Staying Connected

For older adults on a tight or limited budget, free apps are the best place to start. Free apps for the social distancing era include the following:

Facebook Messenger

Facebook Messenger is a great tool because most of us are already on Facebook. In addition to chatting with friends, Facebook Messenger supports video calls for up to eight people and Rooms for 50.

FaceTime

FaceTime’s biggest drawback is that it’s only available on Apple devices. But for Mac users, this free iOS app is one of the simplest out there.

WhatsApp

Big family? WhatsApp supports group chats for up to 256 people so everyone stays in the loop. WhatsApp also supports video calling for connecting face-to-face.

Skype

Skype is another video chat solution that works no matter what type of device or operating system you’re using. Skype supports one-on-one or group video and voice calls.

Marco Polo

Marco Polo is the best app for families separated by time zones. Rather than chatting in real-time, Marco Polo lets users send video messages that can be stored and viewed any time. While Marco Polo’s premium version costs $5 a month, users can access the app’s core features for free.

Teleparty (formerly Netflix Party)

Whether families want to view a new release or a holiday classic, Teleparty lets them do it together with synchronized playback and group chat. Users need a Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, or HBO subscription to watch, but the Teleparty app itself is free.

How to Save Money on Video Devices

When it comes to new technology, older adults prefer to keep it simple. Devices with complicated interfaces and batteries that constantly need charging are likely to end up in a desk drawer.

Tablets and smart displays are the best options for video calling. More comfortable than tiny smartphone screens, these gadgets are both feature-rich and easy to use. Unfortunately, they’re also pricey: Most smart displays start around $200. These include the Amazon Echo Show, Google Nest Hub, and Facebook Portal. Meanwhile, popular tablets like the iPad and Samsung Galaxy Tab run anywhere from a couple of hundred dollars to $1,000-plus.

Two notable exceptions are the Echo Show 8 and Fire HD. While these devices offer smaller displays than the other options, at around $100 they’re great options for buyers on a budget. Alternatively, buyers can wait for price drops on the most popular video calling devices. Watching the Daily Deals at Best Buy is a great way to get a steep discount on new technology. Shoppers can also use a Best Buy discount code to save at any time.

Not everyone wants to purchase a new device to video chat. Whether they’re minimalist or just on a budget, older adults can upgrade their video calling experience without spending hundreds. Many of the most popular webcams, including the Logitech C310 and Microsoft LifeCam, cost less than $50 and come with built-in microphones. A ring light or LED light panel ensures even lighting and good video quality at any time of day.

Now more than ever, it’s important to stay connected. While some older adults assume anything high-tech is out of reach, connecting face-to-face during the pandemic is more accessible than you might think. Whether an older adult has $50 to spend or $1,000, there’s a video calling solution that’s right for them.

Five Fun Activities To Do With Your Grandkids

**Please practice social distancing and wearing masks if/when needed for these activities.

Our thanks to Cristin Howard for this contribution to our blog:

Author Bio: Cristin Howard runs Smart Parent Advice, a site that provides parenting advice for moms and dads. Cristin writes about all of the different ups and downs of parenting, provides solutions to common challenges, and reviews products that parents need to purchase.

Visits from grandchildren are a joyous occasion. There’s nothing quite like the hugs, snuggles, and smiles your grandkids bring when they come to see you.

However, the initial excitement can quickly wear off and kids, as they’re prone to do, might start complaining that they’re bored.

While being bored isn’t necessarily a bad thing, if you’d like to have some fun suggestions for when your grandkids come to visit, look no further.

We have compiled a list of five fun activities to do with your grandkids!

Take a Walk

Getting out and moving is good for every generation, and there are significantly less breakable items outside on a walk than inside.

If your house is on a busy street, or doesn’t have a sidewalk, consider driving to a nearby park or trail to take your walk.

Walking with kids is a surefire way to get them talking, and you’ll be surprised how quickly they start to chatter about all the things going on in their lives.

Depending on the ages of your grandchildren, expect bouts of running interspersed with stopping to look at bugs, leaves, acorns, and exciting cracks in the cement. Exploration is good for kids, and they’ll definitely remind you how to stop and smell the roses!

One advantage of going for a walk is that it’s an outdoor activity.  So, if you put on a mask and practice social distancing, this one is on the safer side of the spectrum.

Do a Puzzle

Puzzles work for kids of almost any age (once they’re past the toddler stage) and with a wide range of size and piece numbers, you’ll be able to find a puzzle that can entertain several people at once, even with a wide age range.

Younger kids can help with more challenging puzzles by sorting out like pieces and having them try to put together a small portion of the puzzle.

Puzzles themselves have a few extra perks. One is that you can talk and catch up while working on the puzzle, but it takes some of the pressure off when it’s quiet as well. Another is that a puzzle is a come and go activity. This works well for kids with short attention spans, or when parents need to get dinner ready or change a diaper.

Get in the Kitchen

Yup, that’s right, get those kids in the kitchen! If you have some skills (or just a little bit of knowledge) and enjoy whipping up tasty treats, then invite your grandkids to join you when they come over.

Don’t worry if you’re not a great chef. Even making slice n’ bake cookies together, or cooking a box of macaroni and cheese can be a great memory for both you and your grands. The kitchen is an excellent place for kids to learn new things and family traditions, histories, and recipes are often passed down through shared cooking experiences.

Another perk to spending some of your visit in the kitchen is that kids are more likely to eat when they help cook. Learn their favorite foods and encourage them to try new things at the same time!

Trade Technology Secrets

While it’s true that the younger generations typically know the latest and great technology tricks, grandparents often have a few apps and ideas of their own that they can share with their grandkids.

Playing with different apps or even learning how to use technology better is an easy and educational way to pass the time with your family. If your grandchild is an artist, they can draw you on a drawing tablet and send you a digital copy, or if they love to code, ask them to show you some of their creations.

There’s always something new to learn and do when it comes to technology, even if it’s just putting together a playlist to share your favorite songs!

Read a Book

A classic for a reason, reading a book never gets old, and it’s an activity that can be enjoyed at every age. Maybe your grandchild is learning to read and wants to read their favorite story to you, or perhaps you have a favorite book that you would love to share with the next generation.

Either way, sitting down and reading a book is entertaining, educational, and creates some common ground to help spark conversation later on in the visit.

If it’s hard for you or your grandchild to read aloud, consider using one of the audiobook apps to listen to a story or podcast together. There are so many to choose from, both long and short, that you’ll never run out of material!

This is actually a great activity for current times as well.  Even with social distancing in place, setting up a Zoom or Facetime call to do a little reading can work quite well.

Zoom Calls, With An Agenda

Depending on their age, your grandchildren might or might not have the patience and attention span for a long conversation.  But, that doesn’t mean that Zoom calls can’t still be fun. They key it to have a few different ideas ready to make the best use of your virtual time together.

One idea is to tell a few jokes. You might pick up a children’s joke book and read a few near the beginning of each call. This is a great way to get things off to a good start.

You can also play games like Twenty Questions.  Games like this can be a lot of fun and a great way to spend quality time from kids, even when you’re not in the same room.

Make Visits Count

If you feel pressured to make sure your grandkids have a fun time with you, take a deep breath and relax.

Kids have a way of finding things to do and the most important activity when you’re together is spending time and making memories. And for that, you don’t need to plan much of anything!

4 Ways to Refresh and Feel Your Best Despite the Coronavirus

Our thanks to Gabriel Patel for this contribution to our blog. 

Feeling good about yourself – both inside and out – is essential for keeping a positive outlook on life. But since heading to the salon or beauty parlor hasn’t been an option for some time, you need to get creative when it comes to looking and feeling your best. Here are four ways to refresh, whether you’re staying home or heading out as pandemic restrictions lift.

1. Expand Your Perspective

As an older adult experiencing the pandemic, you might feel more “other” than ever before. Though quality of life is a concern for many people, empty nesters or those without family around often feel overlooked. But the truth is, the older generation has more of an influence on society and the economy than you might think.

Expanding your perspective by exploring resources from The Business of Aging could help reframe your thoughts on your coronavirus experiences. At the very least, you’ll learn that you have more to offer than the younger set might think.

2. Indulge in Self-Care

Self-care is one way to pamper yourself without leaving home. Whether you’re avoiding outings in public or want to stress less and continue to stay home, dedicating time to caring for your body is beneficial.

Schedule a spa day at home to refresh your body and mind. Consider adding CBD soap to your routine, especially if you’re managing dry or otherwise sensitive skin. Before buying, check out sizes, scents, and whether your favorite CBD soap is full- or broad-spectrum.

Other rejuvenating skin treatments can help combat the effects of staying indoors for so long. Remaining in self-isolation with the AC on has likely caused your skin to become drier than normal.

Prevention recommends choosing a moisturizer based on your skin type, whether you have sensitive skin or are prone to adult acne outbreaks. Especially for delicate facial skin, which becomes thinner as you age, consider a gentle moisturizing product.

If you plan to venture out as pandemic restrictions lift, pack sunblock along, too; studies suggest that only 15 percent of older adults regularly use sun protection.

3. Get Moving in New Ways

Moving your body is always trendy, but these days, it’s more about innovative routines that you can do anywhere.

Trying a virtual fitness class is a low-stakes way to try a new exercise regimen at home. Programs like SilverSneakers are typically covered by your health insurance and offer health provider-endorsed activities for enhancing balance, increasing muscle strength, and more.

If you opt for in-person courses, check out classes near you that take place outdoors. You can also seek fitness opportunities that employ other methods of reducing germ transmission, such as reducing class sizes and implementing social distancing.

4. Declutter Your Home

Like most Americans, you may have decided to start a new hobby or begin projects around the house during the pandemic. But the combination of doing more at home and not being able to entertain could mean your home has become cluttered.

You might not think it matters much, but Mayo Clinic confirms that clutter around the house can impact your mental health and distract you from important tasks. Extra stuff everywhere can even impact your sleep – so it’s vital to start creating more open space in your home.

Taking it step by step, and day by day is the best way to begin cleansing your living space. Break down tasks into manageable chunks, and you’ll accomplish more and feel better while doing it.

Staying home for such a long period has impacted many older adults in ways they didn’t expect. But now that society is reopening, the transition to the new normal requires an effort. By expanding your perspective, caring for yourself, and freeing up your living area, you can start to feel like yourself again – even as things continue to change.

Photo via Unsplash

After decades of denial, pandemic is making Minnesota baby boomers feel their age

By Kevyn Burger Special to the Star Tribune

Baby boomers, the generation that refuses to age, might have met their match in the coronavirus.

Marilyn and Juan Galloway exchanged a look that many married-with-children couples might recognize.

Their 22-year-old daughter had just dropped an unintentional bombshell, one that left them equal parts amused and wounded.

“She said, ‘If you guys get COVID, you’ve lived your lives,’ ” said Marilyn, of White Bear Lake. “She was dead serious, like, ‘You’re elderly and at the end of the road.’ We were stunned. We’re 55 and 63. We run, golf and bike. We’re more active than our kids. At the age that my grandmother wore a housecoat, I spiked my hair and dyed it purple.”

For baby boomers, it seems that COVID-19 has done what self-denial and evidence to the contrary has been unable to do: make them feel old.

For the generation whose youthful battle cry was “Don’t trust anyone over 30” and who prided themselves on remaining relevant as the years accumulated, being lumped in with the cohort regarded as frail and vulnerable has come as a shock.

“The pandemic has been a reckoning for baby boomers,” said Scott Zimmer, a speaker and trainer for Bridgeworks, a Wayzata consulting company that advises businesses on generational dynamics.

Based on sheer size, the 76 million American boomers, now between ages 56 and 74, have been courted by marketers since their postwar arrival. They have reframed every life stage they’ve passed through and were in the process of rewriting the script for their retirement years when the coronavirus arrived and stripped away their pretensions.

“They retain a youthful spirit and don’t want to slow down like previous generations. They take on encore careers and find new activities to be passionate about,” Zimmer said. “Now they’re forced to acknowledge that they’re not invincible. Even if they’re in great shape, they can’t deny that their age puts them in greater danger if they catch the virus.”

Dings and Dents

Writer Bill Souder’s upcoming biography of novelist John Steinbeck is titled “Mad at the World.”

That could also describe the 70-year-old author’s feeling about the way his age group is characterized.

“ ‘Seniors.’ ‘Elderly.’ I don’t like those terms. ‘Your sunset years.’ The labels they attach feel like they are trying to erase you. The message is that when you get older than a certain age, you’re in this other category. You are diminished, a fossil,” he said. “I don’t belong in that club.”

Souder has preferred to define himself by his activities rather than his age.

“I ride my bike, I still wade a trout stream. Last year I got a new hunting dog to trudge through the forest and fields with me. I do the same things I did when I was 40, but a little slower,” he said. “I’m like a golf ball. I’ve got dings and dents, a little asthma, a little heart disease.”

Since the arrival of the virus, Souder’s pre-existing conditions, previously regarded as minor and manageable, have prompted him to act with caution. He’s isolating in his home in Washington County in the company of his wife, their adult son who’s quarantining at home following a furlough and Sasha the wire-haired pointing griffon.

“At a certain age you are at an elevated risk and you have to live your life differently,” he admitted. “The science is clear. I can’t spin it.”

Ageism at the Root

For many boomers, the pandemic is revealing, even cementing, some long-held negative stereotypes associated with aging.

“They are experiencing ageism with the assumption that a number — their age — is the defining marker,” said Katie Smith Sloan, president and CEO of LeadingAge, a national association of nonprofit providers of aging services. “They may have experienced ageism in the workplace, but not in their day-to-day lives. They’re seeing how the contributions of older adults are undervalued and underappreciated.”

Age is just a number, but how that number is perceived is subjective. As people get older, the definition of “old” changes. In a Pew Research Center study, only 21% of those between the ages of 65 and 74 said they felt old, and just 35% of those 75 and older self-identified that way.

Advances in medical science in the past half-century have created a longevity revolution that is giving Americans not only longer life spans, but more years of good health. Still, anyone north of 55 is often lumped into the same age category.

Lori Bitter believes that happens out of “ignorance or laziness.”

The president of the Business of Aging, a California consultancy that advises companies marketing to mature consumers, Bitter thinks the older demographic needs to be sliced thinner.

“There’s not enough understanding that 65 and 85 are vastly different, just as people who are 50 and those who are 65 are nowhere in the same territory. Some of the language used for this vast, diverse group is ridiculous,” she said.

“Companies and others trying to speak to the different ends of the cohort need to distinguish between them,” she said.

It’s a fine point that the pandemic does not take into account.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that “the greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older,” the CDC also generalizes with the statement that “As you get older, your risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases.”

That means that in the foreseeable future, taking the threat of the virus into consideration may cause baby boomers to live more constricted lives.

“We really don’t want to get it, so we are being conservative,” said Souder. “We don’t touch our kids. We sit in the backyard. All bets are off on when that will change. But I’m not bedridden, I don’t have one foot in the grave. I’m here and a high-mileage version of myself.”

Kevyn Burger is a Minneapolis-based freelance broadcaster and writer.

This article is originally featured in StarTribune.

Top 5 Reasons Older Adults Are More Productive Becoming Entrepreneurs

Our thanks to Mohit Sharma for this contribution to our blog. 

 

Presenting the new age entrepreneurs, They are all above 65!

An unexpected generation of entrepreneurs is transpiring in the market. You may see new age people, young and full of notions and impulsive energy, passionate about business and working for more than 100 hours per week. Full time retirement has become underrated and so many seniors are preferring to work even after their retirements from their full time jobs!

Just for a sec, imagine you are 75! What picture pop ups in your mind? A retired old person, correct? We live in an ageist society, where your dreams are a threat to others. People try to threaten you. But so many older adults have proven this wrong. There are so many entrepreneurs over 50. We will discuss the benefits of being an entrepreneur for senior adults.

According to a study by Forbes “people over 55 are twice as likely as people under 35 to launch a high-growth startup.” This could be any business, be it traditional brick mortar business or any online business. So no matter what they – senior adults choose to start up with, they have a lifetime of experience which is enough to get started.

Starting a business is the best way where the old adults can use their experience to the fullest. Among older men, business is trending as they desire to be their own boss. Among older women, it’s a long time held passion that they want to fulfill.

Though there are challenges and opportunities such as getting funds, lack of support from society, ageism – it knocks down the confidence. But at the same time, being in this age is an interesting time, you can open up new surprises!

The online business has boomed among senior adults who are looking to start a business from home. Let’s see the reasons:

1. Freedom of Time

As you are retired from a full time job, you can give time to your own, for your business or for a new startup. So you have all the time with you now. With this precious time, so many tasks can be achieved. This is the beauty of time, it is like a freedom, once you are retired, you have it all, it is all yours.

So, adult entrepreneurs can focus more and be more productive as they can give it time and focus. You have all this time, you can work on multiple things simultaneously for example, you can be a Consultant for ecommerce and at the same time become a Shopclues seller. It is very good ecommerce marketplace to earn good profit online.

2. Rich Experience

It is beyond doubt that starting your business at an older age means you have ages of experience to use. You are seasoned and it is truly valuable. If you have been in huge organizations, you have gained valuable experience and skill set. Such organizations offer excellent skills to lead your own enterprise through all the growth stages.

The new startups need advice from a highly skilled person who has an excellent experience. Let’s say if you are someone who has knowledge about selling items on paytm as a paytm seller, you can become a consultant for people looking out to sell on paytm. This new e-commerce marketplace has very high number of users searching for new products everyday.

3. Age is an asset

I have seen senior adults becoming Snapdeal Seller’s and earning good income. They have worked very hard setting up their online store on the marketplace. According to various adults, they take their age as an asset. The Rich experience and network that they have gained their entire life is noteworthy and is worth more than hundreds of degrees.

So whichever niche senior adults choose to start business after retiring, they are surely like to excel. According to a study by Stanford Center, the senior adults are considered as the pillars of the company. ”They are better collaborators, and they are more loyal. They make excellent mentors!”

So considering their age as an asset, unleashing their true potential is the major concern.

4. Rich Network

As you have been around for a longer period of time, the contacts or network of people is relatively wider for you. This network can be a source of investors, partnerships, advisors who can help you out when in need. Perhaps, the many years spent in the corporate built in professional contacts will help you now!

5. Passion to start something new

Working the entire life sometimes leads to saturation. People want to try out different things. There is an unnerving passion which is seen in the older adults. As they are fully aware about their capabilities, skills and expertise, knowing what will work for them or not is not even a question for them anymore.

Young entrepreneurs are generally not sure about their success. But older adults are sure about their success as they have a passion and sense of self awareness.

Options to start:

1. Starting an Online Business

Ecommerce or online business are the latest trends in the business domain. Building an online store and selling products online is easier because of ecommerce marketplaces such as Amazon and it is a great option. You can sell on amazon very easily, just get started with the seller registration process and list your products. Your e-store is ready in a few simple steps!

Starting a business after years of experience in retail or sales, it can be a new area of expertise for you. E-Commerce is an elevation which does not even require a physical retail location. So this is an excellent option to start an ecommerce business.

So if you have decided to go for this option, you can either create your own website from scratch with a team of IT professionals else, start selling on the trending marketplaces which are already well built, you just need to set up your products.

The decision is yours of course. Based upon your ideas, goals, available resources and the target audience one must come to a conclusion.

If you are planning to sell on various marketplaces, I am here to help you!

2. Content Writing For Blogs and E-Commerce Products

If you are fond of writing and sharing your experience, blogging is the best way to share your skill and create an audience for your own firm or, you can work as a freelancer for other firms. Companies these days are hugely concerned about their online presence. Indexing plays an important role. To be on the top notch, content and blogs are the key.

So when any company wants to start with a serious blogging, they go to professionals with rich experience in the respective domain. If you are someone who wants to blog for other companies then there is Upwork and Elance which can get you started.

So, decide your area of expertise, what do you want to convey to the people with your blog, what do you want to accomplish, etc.

3. Business Coaching and Speaker

Senior adults are highly experienced and skilled retirees for whom business coaching or consulting is the best option to get started. The young people need someone to show direction. There is an extreme need of experienced people, who can guide and lead the way to visualise businesses.

I have met a senior adult who had a rich experience as a flipkart seller, so being in this area for so long, he has started consulting the young. He provides coaching to the young who are in dire need of a direction.

Every course in the world is available online. Most of the senior adults have valuable life learning lessons to teach. One can create online courses or webinars to share their expertise meticulously. So many portals such as Udemy, Unacademy and Techable allow users to create their own videos, easy to create and share with the audience.

4. Social Media Agency

With the increased use of social media, social media marketing is trending these days. Social media marketing is marketing or promotion of products using social media. As everyone is aware of social media these days, this business to promote products on social platforms is a huge benefit.

So if you are someone with a background of marketing, and knowledge about various tools this is the correct profile for you. You can start your own social media agency, be your own boss! Lovely isn’t it.

5. Graphic Designing

Graphic designing has always been in high demand. If you have an existing knowledge in this area, you can build your own business to provide graphic designing services. Freelancing is the best option here.

People with startups, need logos, designs for their websites, prototypes etc. So this is an evergreen field which is always in demand.

Author Bio:

Mohit is an ECommerce Enthusiast and Owner of MohitECommerce. He is Working With Many Vendors in Different Categories of Products Across Various Marketplaces. He is Very Good at Amazon Seller Training, Amazon FBA, Amazon Seller Registration, Amazon Brand Registry, Amazon Account Suspended (Making Plan of Action). He Likes To Help All Type of Businesses Mainly Small and Medium Businesses Which are eager to Step in Online Business.

10 Innovative Apps for Seniors

Our thanks to Artur Meyster for this contribution to our blog. 

Smartphones each year are farther away from being a cellphone and closer to being a mobile supercomputer. Therefore, it is undoubted that they play an essential role in our daily lives. The rapid advancements of technology have allowed developers to create apps that can make our lives easier—especially for seniors. Whether or not you are a fan of tech, below are some innovative apps that might come in handy and bring about positive impacts in your life.

1. FallSafety

The app offers help when you need it the most. With its intelligent fall detection feature, FallSafety can detect when a user experiences a fall and will automatically send an alert to an emergency contact or healthcare organization. The app takes a few seconds after the fall to send the alert, in case it’s a false alarm. The app is available for Android, iOS, and Apple Watch users.

2. Red Panic Button 

This app is for everyone to use in emergencies. If you find yourself in a threatening situation or if you worry about your safety, you can whip out this app and press the red button that will immediately send a text message and an email containing your GPS coordinates to your emergency contacts. This app is especially great for seniors who have problems with mobility as it will ensure they get the right help at the right time, with just a push of a button.

3. Lumosity

Lumosity is a brain-training app that can help improve a user’s memory and focus. While we could all use a little brain teaser every now and then, seniors especially can benefit tremendously by using Lumosity as it keeps the mind active in a fun way. The app offers various interactive features to sharpen your problem-solving skills and math abilities, among others.

4. Seniors Phone

At the rate of which technology is advancing, it is understandable how some seniors might find it overwhelming. That is, however, a problem of the past. Seniors Phone is an app that changes the user interface of any smartphone to a simplified version. You can customize everything—from the size of the fonts to the buttons—to make it easier for a user to navigate the smartphone. Some other features include bright-colored widgets for better identification and an SOS button which can send a distress signal to an emergency contact. 

5. VizWiz

Many seniors have deteriorated vision which can make daily activities a real challenge. Enter the VizWiz app, which allows a user to take a photo of their surrounding and receive the corresponding descriptions. According to its developer, the app combines automatic image processing, anonymous web workers, and members of the user’s social network in order to collect fast and accurate answers to their questions.

6. EyeReader

This is another app that is meant to help individuals with visual impairments. The app is essentially a unique reading magnifier that can help many who find it difficult to read the smaller print. As we age, our visions will likely deteriorate, therefore this app can prove to be really helpful for seniors to perform daily tasks that involve reading.

7. MedMinder

MedMinder is not only an app, but it is also hooked to an automated pill dispenser. This innovative device helps seniors to stay independent by alerting them about the right time to take their medications. Its safety features ensure that pill mix-ups are a thing of the past. The dispenser will be locked at all times unless it’s time to take a pill. First, the compartment will flash, then the device will make a beeping noise before sending an alert via the mobile app. If the patient fails to take the pill at the right time, the app will notify all caregivers. 

8. LibriVox

We all love a good story but what happens when your vision starts to deteriorate and reading becomes more of a hassle than a hobby? Opt for audiobooks. LibriVox offers an extensive list of audiobooks that are recorded by volunteers, available on the free public domain for anyone and everyone interested. Users can either choose to listen to the audiobooks online or download them for later. 

9. Yesterday USA

For those who are feeling nostalgic about the old times, Yesterday USA is the perfect app for them. The app is an internet radio station that broadcasts old radio shows from the 1920s to the 1970s. Now in its 31st year, the best part about Yesterday USA is you can tune in any time of the day as it operates 24 hours. 

10. Medisafe 

Medisfe is an app that works with Machine Learning and AI. The app is for seniors to keep track of all their medications. It gives reminders of when to take each pill and also alerts users when the prescription is running low. Medisafe also lets users enter their caregivers’ information, allowing the app to send alerts if the users forgot to take a pill.

What to Do With Your Home After Transitioning to Assisted Living

Our thanks to Jim Vogel for this contribution to our blog. 

When seniors transition into an assisted living facility, there are many questions raised about the home they’re leaving behind. After spending years of their life in their house, it can be difficult to determine the best option. Generally speaking, there are three choices seniors are faced with: selling their home, renting it out, or giving it to a family member. Each option comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. It would behoove seniors and their loved ones to consider their financial and overall life circumstances before deciding on one of these options.

Sell the house to pad your savings.

The traditional step to take when moving out of a home is to list it on the market and put the proceeds toward a new property. Even though you’re not going to purchase a new home, you can still use the money to help cover the cost of the assisted living facility (assisted living in California averages $3,750 a month) or to pay off prior debts.

Before listing your home on the market, it’s important to take note of the average price of similar properties in your area to help determine what to do with your own (Alameda homes have been selling for an average of $979,000 over the last month). You want to avoid missing out on potential earnings from underpricing and prolonging a sale due to asking for too much. If you have the resources, hiring a real estate agent can also be a great way to sell your house smoothly.

Entrust it to a family member.

If you don’t like the idea of losing your home or renting it out to tenants, you can always entrust it to a family member for safekeeping. You’ll be able to maintain ownership of the property without having to worry about maintenance or upkeep. You might even find a relative willing to live in the home while paying a small fee. You’ll have the benefit of monthly income without the hassle and responsibility of dealing with renters.

Some seniors may want to go a step further and legally transfer ownership of their old home to a family member. This can be done immediately following your transition into an assisted living home or set up for a posthumous transfer of ownership. Either way, you can be sure that the home is taken care of and stays in the family.

Find tenants for a monthly income.

It’s a sad fact that millions of seniors in the United States are struggling financially, but if you’re willing to put in a little effort, your old home can be an excellent source of passive income.

The first step to turning your home into a rental property is making any necessary updates and renovations to make it livable and appealing. Next, you’ll need to find reliable tenants with good credit scores, little to no debt, and no criminal history. You may also have to hire a property manager to care for the property while you’re away. It can be a small yet necessary cost for seniors who don’t have the physical ability and time to keep a rental property up and running.

Moving into assisted living raises many questions about what to do with the home you’re leaving behind. When you have such an emotional connection to your home, it can be difficult to make the right choice. Before making the final call, make sure to consider your current circumstances and think about which option is most suitable.

Photo Credit: Pixabay.com

Assisted Living or Aging in Place? How to Choose

Our thanks to Caroline James of elderaction.org, for this contribution to our blog.

 

Where to live when you’re elderly is the type of decision you want to make before life forces you to do so. If you don’t, you may discover you have fewer options than you’d hoped. Seniors who have a disability are sometimes unable to return home, and without time to spare, they have no choice but to move into whichever care facility has space.

Unfortunately, it’s also exactly the type of decision you want to avoid. No one likes thinking about losing their independence or developing an age-related disability. However, you can’t ignore the fact that two in three seniors will need long-term care as they age.

So, how do you choose where to live and receive care when you’re older? These are the three most important factors to consider.

Location

Some communities are more suited to aging in place than others. For instance, seniors who live near medical facilities, caregiving agencies, public transit, and other important amenities have an easier time aging at home than rural seniors.

Care Needs

Seniors who need a lot of daily support benefits from assisted living, where they don’t have to worry about coordinating and budgeting for in-home care. On the other hand, seniors in good health can retain full independence by aging in place. So, consider your health today and how it may change in the future; if you have chronic health conditions or mobility problems now, you’re more likely to need full-time care later on.

Cost

Assisted living averages $48,000 a year — and that cost is steadily rising. While expensive, assisted living may cost less than you’d spend aging at home. At $22 an hour, the average cost of part-time care is lower than assisted living, but seniors who need round-the-clock care can save money by moving to assisted living.

How to Choose an Assisted Living Facility

Assisted living communities offer a supportive living environment where seniors can get help with day-to-day activities, such as taking medications, preparing meals, and managing personal care. Many assisted living facilities offer perks like fitness centers, gardens, and spas.

Since every assisted living community has its own personality, you’ll want to tour several in the San Francisco area before making a decision. Keep in mind that different communities offer different levels of independence. While some have communal facilities and cater specifically to seniors needing in-home care, others offer apartments and studios for seniors who are still self-sufficient but want some basic assistance with housekeeping and healthcare. Prices also range widely in San Francisco, with assisted living costs ranging from $1,695 to $11,270 a month. Factor your budget and your needs to narrow your search for the right assisted living facility.

How to Age in Place

If you’re in good health, you may be thinking of aging in place. However, are you sure your home is the right one to age in? While most seniors prefer to age in place, many don’t live in a home suited to senior living. They might not pose an obstacle now, but staircases, narrow doorways, and dimly lit spaces become a safety hazard in your 80s.

Some seniors opt to remodel their current home while others choose to buy a new house better suited to aging in place. When making your decision, consider not only the cost but also convenience. The cost savings offered by downsizing may be modest, but moving to a newer home means fewer repairs to worry about during retirement. You’ll also be able to settle in within weeks instead of waiting months for a remodel to finish.

Whatever you choose, don’t wait to think about where you’ll live when you’re older. If you decide to move to assisted living, you’ll need time to prepare your budget and find the perfect facility for your golden years. And if you decide that you want to age in place, starting now means you have many years to enjoy your ideal home.

 

Making Your Mental Health a Priority After the Loss of Your Spouse

Our thanks to Elmer George, Elderville.org,  for this contribution to our blog: 

A few months ago, my husband’s mom passed away. She had cancer and spent her final days in hospice. I must admit watching my father-in-law deal with the loss has been truly eye-opening. My mother-in-law not only did most of their cooking and cleaning, but managed their finances as well. We’ve been helping my father-in-law work through his grief, while also helping him learn to live on his own. I’ve shown him how to cook some easy recipes, my husband has taken over his finances, and we’ve tried to get additional help here and there to fill in the gaps. I’ve learned a lot about what I need to be doing to help my own parents as they age, and I’d love to share my experiences with others.

The loss of a spouse is a devastating life event. For seniors, many who have been with their partners for decades and decades, it can be an enormous blow to their mental health. Not only do you face crippling sadness, loneliness, and depression, but you have to cope while also handling final arrangements, dealing with life insurance policies and the will, and doing what you can to avoid clashing with family. That’s why it’s vital that you make your mental well-being your #1 priority during this trying time.

Don’t try to speed up your grief

“Numerous research studies have demonstrated spousal bereavement is a major source of life stress that often leaves people vulnerable to later problems, including depression, chronic stress, and reduced life expectancy,” notes Psychology Today.

It is counterproductive to try to convince yourself to get over your grief, or to listen to people who tell you that there should be a time limit on your mourning. While prolonged depression stemming from the loss of a spouse can lead to health problems, attempting to suppress grief can also be incredibly detrimental. Know that you are allowed to feel sad, and never try to speed up your grieving process.

One of the best ways to begin the grieving process is to have a service for your spouse. Whether the service is a funeral or for cremation, this is an important first step. A service honors your spouse, brings family together, begins the healing process, and may bring loved ones the closure they need.

Avoid short-term fixes that can become bad habits

You might think that it’s okay to develop a few bad habits because you’re just getting through the hard times and these new habits aren’t part of your normal lifestyle, just part of the grieving process. But relying on alcohol, smoking, drugs, or overeating to help you cope with your emotional pain is even more dangerous for seniors than for younger people. Alcohol, for example, exacerbates mental health problems like anxiety and depression and is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, and some forms of cancer. Not only that, but seniors tend to already be on more medications, which can have negative interactions with other substances.

Focus on eating right and exercising

The best thing you can do for your brain is to eat right and exercise. Getting enough physical activity helps our brain produce chemicals that improve our mood. What we put in our bodies is our fuel, and if you feed yourself subpar fuel, you’re going to have poor performance. If you want to help your brain battle depression and anxiety, stick to a healthy diet and be sure to get at least 30-45 minutes of moderate activity per day.

“Research in humans shows that exercise can stimulate the brain’s ability to maintain old network connections and make new ones vital to healthy cognition,” says the National Institutes of Health.

Force yourself to be social

When dealing with the loss of a spouse, many seniors tend to self-isolate. But this is one of the worst things you can do for your mental health. Talking with family and friends is one of the best ways to overcome excessive grief. “The most compassionate self-action you can take is to find a support system of caring friends and relatives who will provide the understanding you need,” says Oprah.com. Another way to talk to people about your grief is to join a grief group or seek counseling. These options may be available either locally or online.

There is no magic bullet for dealing with the devastating grief that comes with losing a spouse. But if you make a point to focus on your own mental health, you’ll be much more likely to succeed.

About Elderville.org:

Elderville.org is a resource guide for everything related to seniors. We connect our readers to reliable sources on the internet so they don’t have to spend time searching. We have safety tips for daily activities, and resources that range from healthcare to volunteering.

Article & quick links provided by ElderVille: https://elderville.org/

Find your helpful quick links here for Seniors:

Can I Get a Mortgage if I’m Retired?
https://www.creditsesame.com/blog/mortgage/can-i-get-a-mortgage-if-i-m-retired/

A Guide to Downsizing for Seniors and Their Loved Ones
https://www.redfin.com/blog/seniors-guide-to-downsizing

Should You Own or Rent a Home in Retirement?
https://www.fool.com/mortgages/2017/05/04/should-you-own-or-rent-a-home-in-retirement.aspx

Home Modifications Increase Senior Safety
https://www.angieslist.com/articles/home-modifications-increase-senior-safety.htm

How to Save for a Down Payment on a House
https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-save-for-a-down-payment-on-a-house-1289847

7 Home Improvement & Remodeling Ideas That Increase Home Value (And What To Avoid)
https://www.moneycrashers.com/7-home-improvements-to-increase-its-value/

Home Construction & Design Techniques for Child Safety
https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/child-safety-home-design-and-projects/

How to Deter Burglars: Keeping Potential Robbers Away From Your Home
https://www.asecurelife.com/how-to-deter-burglars/

The Business of Aging reports on how older adults are “Hacking Longevity”

Hacking Longevity is the first study to examine how three generations of adults over the age of 50 – Generation X, Baby Boomers, and Silent Generation – are thinking about and planning for longer lives. Until now, the idea of increased longevity has been mostly conceptual and aspirational. Through a rigorous research process, Hacking Longevity examination, provides insights on how brands and organizations can better serve consumers of the longevity economy. The study was conducted in the Fall of 2017 and Winter of 2018 and led by Lori Bitter at The Business of Aging.

The study debuted at AARP’s Living 100 event in Washington DC in April. This timeline illustrates key inflection points in people’s lives as they age, as revealed in the data. To learn more about Hacking Longevity, join us in June at The Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit where we will provide a briefing for attendees.

Hacking Longevity was conducted in partnership with Collaborata, and underwritten by AARP, Wells Fargo Advisors, GreatCall, and Proctor and Gamble Ventures.